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IFTF Deliverables

The Future of Science, Technology, and Well-being 2020 Forecast Map [SR-1309] - $35.00

Science and technology (S&T) have been transforming human well-being in profound ways for all history. Yet, when many think about how science and technology will affect the future of well-being, their imagination is limited to the invention of new medicines. In last year’s ten-year forecast map, The Future of Science, Technology, and Well-being, we explore how exciting developments in S&T will transform the way we respond to health challenges. It was designed to inspire you to consider new possibilities, such as how technology can enable us to remake our bodies and minds; how social networks can be programmed to improve our individual and collective well-being; and how technology can provide us with high-resolution previews of the health risks and assets in our day-to-day environment.

Price is negotiable on bulk orders, please contact Kim Lawrence or Dawn

The Future of Cities, Information, and Inclusion Map (SR-1352) - $35.00

Over the next decade, cities will continue to grow larger and more rapidly. At the same time, new technologies will unlock massive streams of data about cities and their residents. As these forces collide, they will turn every city into a unique civic laboratory—a place where technology is adapted in novel ways to meet local needs. This ten-year forecast map, The Future of Cities, Information, and Inclusion, charts the important intersections between urbanization and digitalization that will shape this global urban experiment, and the key tensions that will arise. 

Price is negotiable on bulk orders, please contact Kim Lawrence or Sean Ness for more information. 

 


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2009 Map of the Decade [SR-1218] - $15.00

The future is our chance to be new. This year’s Ten-Year Forecast research delves into issues from a collapsing economy paving the way for new kinds of value to a new voice rising from the Global South plotting a new path for the next big economy, to extreme climate conditions wiping the landscape clean, to a new neuroscience presenting an extraordinary new picture of humans, and much much more.

This year’s map blends forecasts of innovation and disruption with a handful of Superstruct Ecologies—along with dozens of signals on the horizon—to create the 2009 Map of the Decade that features five big shifts:

1) Extreme-Scale Collaboration,

2) Alternative Wealth,

3) Superstruct Ecologies,

4) Mega-Structures, and

5) A Governance Renaissance.

Poster 2008 Map of the Decade (4' x 12') [SR-1142B] - $750.00

The view this year is distinctly biological. Even in arenas more social than biological, new biological identities—and new understandings of biological connectedness—draw people into unexpected affiliations. We turn to face the decade with a naturalist’s eye: we’re looking for the intricate connections that form the webs of our evolving life as if our futures depend on it.

Think of it, perhaps, as an organism, starting from a single cell. Like any organism, it unfolds from a small set of internal signals. First there’s just one cell. Then it divides. The new cells specialize and become patterned. The pattern becomes a template for further development. As the future begins to take shape, you can see it in what biologists call fate maps—molecular snapshots of the embryonic cells as they divide, over and over, to reveal what they will become.

 

The Future of Foodscapes Map [SR-1106] - $10.00

From public policy debates over the obesity epidemic, diabetes, and trade subsidies to new technologies promising more nutritious foods and popular political movements around slow foods and organics, food is becoming a central theme in how we think about health, politics, culture, and globalization.

Food companies must increasingly address health concerns and ecological issues such as sustainability.  As consumers show an increasing interest in healthy foods, and fears or anxieties over the quality of food from the global food chain, we face a bewildering array of controversies, business opportunities, and dilemmas.  Indeed, we are now entering a transition period from a producer-oriented food system to an era focused on the needs of consumers. This landscape of food trends, evolving consumer needs, ecological niches, food conflicts, and demographic changes constitute what we call foodscapes.

Global Health Economy Map [SR-1003] - $10.00

Health benefits increasingly define consumer value. With more responsibility for the cost of their health care, people are turning to the broader marketplace for solutions rather than just the traditional health care delivery system. this trend is accompanied by an expansion of what it means to be healthy, what is considered therapeutic, and what is an appropriate site for intervention or treatment. as we move toward a world of more healthy lifestyles and holistic approaches, in the way we parent, what we eat, how we work, and even how we keep our homes, much of daily life will be viewed through a health lens.

Open Health Toolkit-Companion to Map [SR-1117B] - $10.00

Open Health applies the principles of open innovation to the global health economy. It encourages the opening up of a firm’s boundaries, resulting in extraordinary collaboration both inside and outside the firm. Sources of innovation move from traditional in-house R&D units to a range of entrepreneurs, startups, academics, university labs, and independent scientists around the world. Open Health is a new business strategy for health companies that provides a framework for recasting business models and innovation systems, and for rethinking the boundaries of health itself.

The Open Health Toolkit provides an overview of key issues you will need to address in adopting Open Health, details of a six-step process we developed to help you craft Open Health strategies, “how-to” exercises that help you think through each step of the process, and Ten Principles of Open Health to help guide your innovation process.

Open Health Map of Disruptive Innovation [SR-1117A] - $10.00

Open Health applies the principles of open innovation to the global health economy. It encourages the opening up of a firm’s boundaries, resulting in extraordinary collaboration both inside and outside the firm. Sources of innovation move from traditional in-house R&D units to a range of entrepreneurs, startups, academics, university labs, and independent scientists around the world. Open Health is a new business strategy for health companies that provides a framework for recasting business models and innovation systems, and for rethinking the boundaries of health itself.

The Open Health Map shows the larger context of forces driving open innovation in the global health economy.

 

The Future of Work Map [SR-1109] - $10.00

Amplified Individuals / Amplified Organizations
The Technology Horizons Program’s research on the Future of Work comes at an exciting time for the intersection of work and technology. Technology has become integrated into virtually every aspect of work. And because we spend so much time working, work really is the place where we most directly feel the impact of developing technologies. From collaboration to productivity; from new ways of approaching workspace design to the increasing ability to work from virtually anywhere; and from hiring and recruitment to new skill sets—it is a time of experimentation for companies and organizations as trends in technology converge to change what it means to work.

The Future of Making Map [SR-1154] - $10.00

Two future forces, one mostly social, one mostly technological, are intersecting to transform how goods, services, and experiences—the “stuff” of our world—will be designed, manufactured, and distributed over the next decade. An emerging do-it-yourself culture of “makers” is boldly voiding warranties to tweak, hack, and customize the products they buy. And what they can’t purchase, they build from scratch. Meanwhile, flexible manufacturing technologies on the horizon will change fabrication from massive and centralized to lightweight and ad hoc. These trends sit atop a platform of grassroots economics—new market structures developing online that embody a shift from stores and sales to communities and connections.