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An Open Health Competition

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and Changemakers.net have launched "Designing for Better Health," a competition that calls for projects that demonstrate novel and effective approaches to enouraging behavior changes to improve people's health. In a letter to the Changemakers community, RWJF explains:

Lurching Towards Open Science

Openness is rocking the scientific world. Accept it or proceed at your own risk. As an article last week in Nature points out: scientists are posting unprecedented amounts of experimental data online in “open notebooks”.

But wait.
Science in academia is becoming more closed, driven by regulatory shifts in how funding is tied to ownership of research products. As the New York Times reports:

Unleashing Open Source for Development in Africa

A few members of the Tech Horizons team are in Johannesburg, South Africa this week, launching a new IFTF program (Science In Place) at the XXV World Conference of the International Association of Science Parks.
I have been taking the opportunity to meet with a number of people who are trying to leverage open source technology to bridge the "digital divide" and spread computing and communications tools throughout the country and the entire continent.

A year of television = 2000 Wikipedias

My colleague Jason Tester pointed out (ultimately via Boing Boing) a post by Clay Shirky that helps answer a question that often comes up about collaborative media. As Jason put it, "Often when I give talks illustrated with examples like Wikipedia, delicious, Flickr, etc, to largely non-tech audiences (HR for example) someone will ask 'Where do people find the time?' or the less thoughtful 'Is this just about nerds in basements?'"

Clay points out two things. First, that a lot of time that goes into writing blogs, adding content to wikis, mashing things up on Google Earth, etc., is taken from other activities like television-watching. He notes that Americans watch something like 200 billion hours of television a year.

That's an amazing amount of time, and when you can take little bits of your time and spend them on projects that other people can also spend little bits of time on, it adds up pretty quickly.

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