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Explore the World of Superstruct

Superstruct was a massively multiplayer forecasting game, created by the Institute for the Future, and played by more than 7000 citizen future-forecasters from September - November, 2008.

Although the game is no longer live, you can still learn about superstructing and explore some of our archived game content:

Superstructing the Next Decade: 2009 Ten-Year Forecast

We're excited to make the 2009 Ten-Year Forecast materials—Superstructing the Next Decade—available online.

Sustain Saskatchewan

"Trees make the prairies tolerable." 

Applying Superstruct Design for an Augmented Reality Developers Camp

Recently a few colleagues and I organized an Augmented Reality Developers Camp - a perfect example of a "Superstruct" an idea introduced In 2008 by Jane McGonigal,  Kathi Vian, and the IFTF Ten Year Forecast team. 

Chadians look to past traditions to survive present food crisis, and I am reminded of some Superstruct stories

In IFTF’s first ever massively multiplayer forecasting game Superstruct (www.superstructgame.net)
players spent a lot of time and energy trying to solve 5 superthreats. One of them, Ravenous, focused on a hypothetical global food crisis. How do we restructure our eating habits and global food networks? Ideas ranged from rooftop gardens to virtual spaces that allowed people from around the world to connect over best practices and try out new methods, to seed ATMS and the idea that food is a right, not a luxury, and should be free. Someone even created a superstruct involving insects as our primary source of protein, insects4food. The superstruct won an award for thinking outside of the box, but not for practicality. Most of us think eating insects as out primary source of protein is taking it too far, but for others, it might not be that bad.

Ruby's Bequest: What Superstructing Looks Like

With the Ten-Year Forecast annual retreat just weeks away, the team has been fine-tuning our thoughts about the major reinvention our economy and society is undergoing. Our work on Superstruct last fall has given us a handful of strategies for reorganizing ourselves at both smaller and larger scales, and as I was reading the Ruby's Bequest stories this morning, it was obvious to me that they are superstructing caregiving.

The Best of 2019: Superstruct Honors and Awards are Announced!

On November 17, 2008 the Institute for the Future announced the winners of the Superstruct Awards in a live webcast. Each winner received a personal fan letter from one of the honorary game masters, including Bruce Sterling, Warren Ellis, Tara Hunt, and Tim O'Reilly.

You can watch the complete one-hour recording of the Superstruct Celebration on Ustream, or scroll down to read the results.

Congratulations to all of the honored Super-Empowered Human Individuals!

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Results from our Blended Reality crowd-sourcing experiment -- or, more than 300 ways we provoked the future

At our Fall 2008 Technology Horizons Conference, we crowd-sourced five questions (via Twitter, blogs, email, and SMS) about Blended Realities in 2019.

We received over 300 micro-forecasts in less than 24 hours. Here are the massively collaborative results!

The future of SOCIETY: It is 2019. How do you share your feelings?

The future of HEALTH: It's 2019. Describe your experience with health care.

PROVOKING THE FUTURE OF FOOD: 51 micro-forecasts from the Blended Reality 2008 crowd-sourcing experiment

At our Fall 2008 Technology Horizons Conference, we crowd-sourced five questions (via Twitter, blogs, email, and SMS) about Blended Realities in 2019. Here are the massively collaborative food results!

Question #5: It’s 2019. How do you decide what’s for dinner?

PROVOKING THE FUTURE OF SECURITY: 51 micro-forecasts from the Blended Reality 2008 crowd-sourcing experiment

At our Fall 2008 Technology Horizons Conference, we crowd-sourced five questions (via Twitter, blogs, email, and SMS) about Blended Realities in 2019. Here are the massively collaborative security results!

Question #4: In 2019, who defines your identities, and who governs them?

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